Hiragana Memorization

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seiryu wrote:
Sat Oct 17, 2020 9:07 pm
どういたしまして。アニメ見ている間に字幕使わないほうがいい!How's that for forced practice! Pretty evil...

Ohohoho evil Seiryu-san ga detaaaa

Douitashimashite. Anime miteiru ma ni _____ tsukawanai hou ga ii

That's how much I could read without asking Google-sama xD
So, Jimaku is subtitles. The "ji" part looks a bit like "gaku" xD


 
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negatibuhige wrote:
Sun Oct 18, 2020 5:46 am
Ohohoho evil Seiryu-san ga detaaaa

Douitashimashite. Anime miteiru ma ni _____ tsukawanai hou ga ii

That's how much I could read without asking Google-sama xD
So, Jimaku is subtitles. The "ji" part looks a bit like "gaku" xD
Hahahaha...yup! The first kanji is the kanji for "character/letter". Oh, so another suggestion is learning to use the "radical" means of looking up kanji. Words are almost always very "literal" in that the kanji and even radicals that make up the kanji are part of the word's meaning/definition. Since I look up radicals all the time, I can figure out the context of a word (pretty high accuracy since probably over 95% of words are partially literal) even if I don't know all the kanji.

Speaking of which, that is the hard part where the "roof" has different markings. One 点 ("ten": mark/spec) vs. three "ten" is the difference between "ji" and "manabu". This might be the "Tokyo" dialect/mindeset/rationale (all of my teachers when I was a kid taught this way even if they weren't from the region), but referring things by the "on-yomi" (usually Chinese reading) is weird because "on-yomi" is when kanji are combined together. There are some exceptions but "gaku" is only when it is combined with a second kanji. For example, "kagaku" or science has the "gaku" kanji second.

It is more fitting to refer to the "kun-yomi" (usually Japanese reading and usually has hiragana after it). So 学ぶ for "manabu". There is astronomically more overlap with on-yomi, so context can easily get lost. There is some overlap with kun-yomi, but only a few here and there.

Pretty intensive tangent, but I always recommend studying radicals for the above benefit. So taking the time to look up unknown kanji is a huge benefit. I can teach you how to do this since it's pretty easy online. Doing by a book is technical and quite difficult.


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Whoa. I gotta go over this again later when my brain is calmer but thanks for all the suggestion!
seiryu wrote:
Mon Oct 19, 2020 8:37 pm
I can teach you how to do this since it's pretty easy online.
ONEGAIITASHIMASU!!!!!!!!!!!!!


 
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I used to try practicing Hiragana with some apps that I found in the playstore. I actually learned a few but I kinda stopped practicing so by now I almost forgot everything I learned :ohno:

I wonder if I should give it another try. I wonder what the best pacing is. Like one new character a day and then practicing them everyday? I wonder of I could keep up with that. Also, maybe it would be better if I actually write them down in paper :thinking:


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negatibuhige wrote:
Tue Oct 20, 2020 3:47 am
ONEGAIITASHIMASU!!!!!!!!!!!!!
Hopefully I describe it accurately enough to not need any screenshots. Jisho is great and better than any other online version I've used previously.

So from the main jisho page, click the "Radicals" link in the upper left corner.

Radicals are listed by the number of strokes needed to write them. The order is weird and isn't by commonality, but this is good because it forces me to scan through so by volume of repetition, I've been forced to get better at recognizing/memorizing.

Side tangent: if you want, you can just select each radical one by one to see if it is an actual kanji. I don't know if jisho has the descriptions of non-kanji radicals, but it'd be great if it does. Memorizing the definition/implication of each radical is how you glean context of an unknown word.

Once a radical is selected (most) kanji with this radical are automatically populated and organized by stroke count.

Multiple and any combination of radicals can be selected, so a few selections astronomically cuts down the kanji displayed.

Other than a few exceptions where a clear radical does not make it appear on the search (the program could not have been programmed one kanji at a time, so loopholes being present are expected). I've only had a handful of instances where I had to search for weird combinations because the common radicals would not pull up a certain kanji.

Most of the time, it's super fast and forced exposure to radicals is extremely beneficial in the long run.

I think there's even a draw in option on jisho, but I've never used it since it's much faster to search for it by radicals (except for the few times of glitches).


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Whoa! That's a thorough description. Screencapping the whole thing so that I can easily check back when I do get some time to check out kanji stuff.
Thank you so much for your advice, Seiryu-san. This is extremely helpful!! :brook:


 
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sweetjacky wrote:
Tue Oct 20, 2020 7:32 pm
I used to try practicing Hiragana with some apps that I found in the playstore. I actually learned a few but I kinda stopped practicing so by now I almost forgot everything I learned :ohno:

I wonder if I should give it another try. I wonder what the best pacing is. Like one new character a day and then practicing them everyday? I wonder of I could keep up with that. Also, maybe it would be better if I actually write them down in paper :thinking:
Sorry...I must have loaded the page, had some patients, and you posted in that time.

Nothing replaces mass written repetition. If you are pressed for time, then one at a time would be best. I've never seen someone not teach it by columns => you want to be learning the same starting sound before moving on to different sounds/characters. So a, i, u, e, o. Then ka, ki, ku, ke, ko. Retention is definitely key, so daily practice would definitely help tons if you could do it.
negatibuhige wrote:
Wed Oct 21, 2020 3:51 am
Thank you so much for your advice, Seiryu-san. This is extremely helpful!!
You're welcome!


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seiryu wrote:
Wed Oct 21, 2020 9:30 pm
So a, i, u, e, o. Then ka, ki, ku, ke, ko. Retention is definitely key, so daily practice would definitely help tons if you could do it.
Yeah I think that's the kind of groups that the app I used had. At some point it was just hard to keep all the characters in my head so that's why I'm thinking now maybe my pacing was too fast. And I also never wrote them down on paper which is probably not good for remembering them.


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sweetjacky wrote:
Thu Oct 22, 2020 3:00 am
Yeah I think that's the kind of groups that the app I used had. At some point it was just hard to keep all the characters in my head so that's why I'm thinking now maybe my pacing was too fast. And I also never wrote them down on paper which is probably not good for remembering them.
Ah, probably a little bit of everything. Quizzes and or reviewing to retain the previous hiragana is necessary.

The difference between visual recognition vs. true comprehension is probably best displayed by how even anyone from young adults to kids cannot write kanji. Typing and having it auto-populate makes it so convenient that the memorization/mastery of every radical does not occur. An oversimplification is that the character (hiragana, katanaka, or kanji) is more of a short term memory than a long term memory.

Ah, it was this thread, so I'm just copy pasting an earlier part that might prove helpful for you too:
In terms of studying/memorization, these are the tips I used to get through high school, college, and grad school:

1) cover the exact same content/study material for at least three consecutive days. The goal is to have the content become part of your long-term memory. The speed and extent of recall is astronomically higher if it is a long-term memory. And for something like language, retention is the most important.

2) wean off the amount of time necessary to maintain retention. So the first day will take the most amount of time but it should steadily decrease. Once it is a long-term memory, only sporadic review is necessary to keep the memory.


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The same way you learn anything, my good man. Practice!

I can be your tutor if you like. First lesson is free of charge!


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